Aug 19, 2018  
2018-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2020 Undergraduate Catalog

Business and Innovation


Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: Publication Search

The School of Arts and Sciences will offer a minor in Business and Innovation, effective with the class of 2020. Students will be required to take three (3) foundational courses which will introduce them to core concepts and practices in business and innovation, along with the essential tools for writing a business plan, with interdisciplinary courses offered through the departments of Accounting, Computer Science, and Art/Art History; a three (3) course concentration track which enables to build depth in an area related to business and innovation in one of four tracks: Organizations and Entrepreneurs, Global Engagement, Applied Science, or Design Thinking; one (1) business policy and analysis capstone course which requires them to complete a business plan in their area of focus; and demonstrate competency in Excel through certification.

The BI minor is only available to students in the Schools of Arts and Sciences and Professional Studies. Business School majors are NOT eligible for the minor.

Please Note:


Academic programs vary in their requirements. Students should consult with their faculty advisor and the Academic Guidebook to review the Academic Planning Form pertinent to their program of study. In addition, students should review course descriptions regarding any prerequisites for required courses. Graduation requirements include a minimum of 120 credit hours, although some academic programs may require additional credits. Please refer to the Academic Resources  section of the catalog for more information. Information regarding the Core Curriculum is available within each course and online.

Required Foundational Courses


Foundational courses will introduce students to the core concepts of practices of business and innovation. Tools for creating a business plan (a requirement of the Capstone) will also be introduced in each of the courses.

Required Business Capstone Course


Initially, it is expected that all BI students will be in a single Capstone course. Sections by track area may be developed as the size of the program allows for multiple sections.

BSP 440 - Business Policy and Decision-Making Analysis  (to be re-designated as BUS 440 at the close of the Business Studies Program)

  • This course is a senior-level capstone that covers the principles, methods, concepts and procedures for organizational decision-making from financial, entrepreneurship, strategic and leadership perspectives and must be taken as the final course in the BI Minor. Pre-requisites are five of the six other courses required to complete the BI Minor, including the three foundational courses. It may be taken simultaneously with one of the track concentration courses. Students write a “business plan” for an actual or hypothetical endeavor (examples are a start-up for-profit company or not-for-profit organization, a project within a large organization, political or legislative campaign or others) demonstrating excel competency and ability to apply foundational concepts in accounting, finance, design, and economic market analysis developed in the foundational courses. It is expected that this Capstone will directly build upon the depth of tracks (and eventually tracks may have separate Capstone sections). Track sponsors will provide mentorship on the projects that students intend to pursue in the Capstone.

Eligibility, Registering, Waivers, and Double-Counting


The Business and Innovation minor is only available to students in the Schools of Arts and Sciences and Professional Studies. Business School majors are NOT eligible for the minor. Students in the minor will be able to register for courses approved for the minor as part of the registration for students in the business school.

BI minors may waive out of ACC 103 if they have taken ACC 203 and FIN 207. BI minors may double count two of their major courses toward this minor if the major courses are listed as approved courses in one of the four BI tracks.

Concentration Tracks and Required Concentration Courses


Students build depth in Business and Innovation in tracks reflecting major-aligned disciplinary clusters. Being able to apply concepts from the required core courses into specialized courses within disciplines will enable students to develop track specific skills overlapping with business and design principles. Courses may be added or removed to those listed below as appropriate. Track sponsors will work with students within in track to facilitate advising and course options/availability.

Track One: Organizations and Entrepreneurs


The BI Organizations and Entrepreneurs track is designed to expose non-business majors to the core areas of business, providing them with a broad understanding of business theory, economics, practices, and applications.  It combines a foundational education in business competencies like design thinking and financial principles with courses oriented toward building skills vital for working in a business environment. This track is also applicable to students interested in problem-solving in non-profit or government settings. 

Curriculum: In addition to completing the foundational courses for BI, students may choose any three​ courses from the list below. Pre-requisites apply to some of the courses listed. Depending upon the rules of the Department hosting the students’ major, students may double count 2 of these courses toward the BI minor and their major.

Students in this track may substitute relevant special topics courses with permission of the program chair.

Track Two: Global Engagement


The global engagement track in the BI program is designed to give non-business majors a set of competencies related to the study of global business and innovation, including, an awareness of globalization and global issues, intermediate proficiency in a foreign language, and reflective practice on international experiences.

Curriculum: In addition to completing the foundational courses for BI, students are required to complete the following curricular elements listed below: 1) a globalization course, 2) a foreign language proficiency and 3) coursework at PC directly related to an international educational experience (or approved substitute for students unable to study abroad). Coursework in this track will be developed with the track advisor, including appropriate courses that directly connect with study abroad. Pre-requisites apply for some of these courses. Depending upon the rules of the Department hosting the students’ major, students may double count 2 of these courses toward the BI minor and their major.

1. One Course on globalization from the list below:

2. Foreign Language Proficiency: Students must pass one 3-credit language courses at the 104 level or higher to demonstrate intermediate language proficiency.

3. One PC course connected to study abroad

  • GST 410 - Crossing Borders  (post-study abroad course)
  • Area studies course connected to study abroad (e.g., HIS 424 Europe Since 1945 with study abroad in Europe; HIS 369 Modern China with study abroad in China; PSC 336 Latin American Politics or SPN 212 Hispanic Civilization with study abroad in Latin America; FRN 212 French Civilization with study abroad to France)
  • GST 371 - Topics in Global Service Learning  (approved courses)
  • Maymester PC course with international travel (approved courses)

Track Three: Applied Science


This interdisciplinary track is designed for students interested in developing business skills with a focus on emerging technologies and innovation in STEM fields. The program combines foundational courses in business competencies and data analysis with STEM courses centered on project-based learning and problem solving with a real-world emphasis. There is considerable flexibility in the STEM courses so that students will be able to either specialize in depth in one area or develop breadth in multiple disciplines. Students are encouraged to engage in either a research or internship experience as part of their course work.

Curriculum: In addition to completing the foundational courses for BI, on a space-available basis, students may choose any three courses from the list below. Pre-requisites apply to some of the courses listed. Depending upon the rules of the Department hosting the students’ major, students may double count 2 of these courses toward the BI minor and their major. (NS) is a non-major natural science course.

BIO courses (students may double count two of these courses in the Biology major):

CHM courses:

EPS courses:

MTH courses:

PSY courses:

Track Four: Design Thinking


The Design Thinking Track hones students’ visual and creative skills, enabling them to make meaningful contributions to industry, commerce, and their global context. This track gives students the tools of visual analysis and creative problem solving, allowing them to navigate a world that has become increasingly inundated with visual media and data. The track combines introductory business skills, design, digital media, visual arts, computer graphics, and other electives that enable students to tap into the liberal arts and learn how to apply their skills in the business sector. For Computer Science majors there are several possible sub-tracks including App, Web and Data Warehousing Design.

Curriculum: In addition to completing the foundational courses for BI, on a space-available basis, students may choose any three courses from the list below. Pre-requisites apply to some of the courses listed. The three courses must draw from at least two different disciplines/departments and show progression of at least two different levels (from 100 to 400-level courses). Depending upon the rules of the Department hosting the students’ major, students may double count 2 of these courses toward the BI minor and their major.

100-level courses:

200-level courses:

300-level courses:

400-level courses:

Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: Publication Search